Welcome new UD history teacher: Dr. Steven Fabian

Welcome+new+UD+history+teacher%3A+Dr.+Steven+Fabian

Oliver Lewis, Staff Writer

“Students at Horace Mann may find me making exaggerated facial expressions from time to time,” history teacher Dr. Steven Fabian said. “One can’t live with a mime for over two years and not come away with a heightened sense of how to use one’s eyebrows.” Fabian’s entry into teaching children began when he worked as an au pair for a family in Vienna, Austria when he was 19, where the family’s father was a former mime and stage performer. Fabian will be teaching Atlantic World History and Asia and Africa Since 1945 this year. This summer, Fabian co-edited a special issue of the New York University History Journal, Radical History Review, which highlights the ways in which people were able to break past the gatekeepers of media organizations and governments to share stories that were otherwise suppressed or distorted by people in power, he said. Previously, Fabian taught for 13 years at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Fabian’s classes focused on African history; however, Fabian has also taught classes such as World History Since 1500, Ending Empire, and Struggles of Nation Building, which cover similar material as the classes he will teach this year. Fabian said he was drawn to teaching history by the stories his grandparents shared about their early lives during the Great Depression and World War II. With an urban historian background, Fabian is fascinated by how diverse peoples learn to live in shared spaces, how people come to identify with cities, and how cities grow and develop over time with dynamic population groups. “I love cities, a reason that drew me to Horace Mann, situated as it is in New York City,” Fabian said. In his free time, Fabian hikes and reads for pleasure. During quarantine, Fabian set aside an hour each day to read for leisure. This summer, he completed Amitav Ghosh’s epic “Ibis” trilogy, a historical fiction set during the outbreak of the Opium Wars in China in 1839-1840, which he highly recommends, he said.